5th December 2022

Adding Online Disk to Linux Systems on VMware Workstation

You can add a new disk to Linux-based operating systems that you virtualize with VMware via the SCSI interface without restarting the system. You need to rescan the SCSI buses so that the new disk you added can be detected by the system. SCSI buses are kept under the /sys/class/scsi_host/ directory in RHEL and Debian distributions. Therefore, the SCSI bus scanning process to be done is the same for both distributions.

Adding Disk with VMware Workstation

  • Come to the settings section of the system where you want to add a disk and click the “Add” button. Select the “Hard Disk” option and click the “Next” button.
Add Hardware Wizard
Add Hardware Wizard

 

  • Select the SCSI interface and click the “Next” button.
 SCSI interface
SCSI interface

 

  • Select the “Create a new virtual disk” option and click the “Next” button.
Create a new virtual disk
Create a new virtual disk

 

  • Determine the disk size and click the “Next” button.
Specifty Disk Capacity
Specifty Disk Capacity

 

  • Complete the process by clicking the “Finish” button.
Specify Disk File
Specify Disk File

 

Scanning SCSI Buses in a Linux System

  • You can use the lsblk command or fdisk –l command to check your existing disk blocks before scanning.
root@omer:~# fdisk -l
fdisk -l
fdisk -l

 

  • Scan the SCSI buses with a root user so that the added disk can be seen by the Linux system.
root@omer:~# ls /sys/class/scsi_host/ | while read host ; do echo "- - -" > /sys/class/scsi_host/$host/scan ; done
ls /sys/class/scsi_host/
ls /sys/class/scsi_host/

 

  • When you check your disk blocks again after scanning the SCSI buses, you should see the new disk you added to the system.
root@omer:~# fdisk -l
fdisk -l
fdisk -l

 

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Partitioning the Newly Added Disk

You can make this disk you add to the system ready for use by partitioning it. If your operating system has a graphical interface, you can do this with the “Disk Utility” application or from the command line. We will partition the newly added disk to the system with the “fdisk” tool via the command line.

  • Access the device you want to partition with the fdisk tool. Press the “m” button to get help about what you can do. Press the “n” key to create a new section as seen in the help commands.
root@omer:~# fdisk /dev/sdb
fdisk /dev/sdb
fdisk /dev/sdb

 

  • Press the “n” key to create a new section as seen in the help commands.
Press the “n” key
Press the “n” key

 

  • Press the “p” key to add as primary disk and press the “1” key as the partition number.
Press the "p" key
Press the “p” key

 

  • Write where to start partitioning. Enter the number “2048” and press the “Enter” key to start from the beginning.
First sector number "2048"
First sector number “2048”

 

  • Choose where to end the partitioning. If you want to use the entire disk and create a single partition, write “209715199”.
Last sector number "209715199"
Last sector number “209715199”

 

  • Save the settings you have made by pressing the “w” key.
 pressing the “w” key
pressing the “w” key

 

NOTE: In the process of determining your disk partitions you have done in the previous step, the partitioning has been made based on the starting and ending points. Although this process is not a problem for a single partition, we may want to divide the 100GB part we add to the system into 2 or more partitions. In this case, the end cylinder would not be worth “209715199” but for example “1255” for 10GB. In this way, you can give values in kilobytes, megabytes or gigabytes as the ending value instead of cylinder calculation. For example “Last cylinder, + cylinders or + size {K, M, G} (1-2610, default 2610) for 10GB: For + 10G500MB: Last cylinder, + cylinders or + size {K, M, G} (1- 2610, default 2610): You can give values such as + 500M.

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Formatting the Part Created and Connecting to the System

  • Format the partition you created with the “mkfs” tool. After the mkfs command, you need to put “.” (period) and specify your file system. With mkfs, you can create file systems such as ext2, ext3, ext4, msdos and vfat.
root@omer:~# mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdb
mkfs.ext4
mkfs.ext4

 

  • We mount the formatted disk to the system with the “mount” command. Before mounting, we need to determine where to mount this disk in our system. (In this article, the “disk1” directory was created under the /mnt directory and linked here.)
root@omer:~# mkdir /mnt/disk1
root@omer:~# mount /dev/sdb /mnt/disk1
 mkdir /mnt/disk1 and mount /dev/sdb /mnt/disk1
mkdir /mnt/disk1 and mount /dev/sdb /mnt/disk1

 

  • Finally, check the disk you added to the system with the df -h command.
Check disk with df -h command
Check disk with df -h command

 

Note: If you want your disk mount operation to be valid when your system is rebooted, you need to perform this operation in the fstab file. Just add the line marked below to your fstab file. You can edit your /etc/fstab file with the nano text editor.

root@omer:~# nano /etc/fstab
nano /etc/fstab
nano /etc/fstab

 

  • Now let’s add the following command to our Fstab file.
/dev/sdb        /mnt/disk1      ext4    defaults        0       0

 

 

  • Let’s exit with “ctrl + x” command on this screen.
exit with "ctrl + x" command
exit with “ctrl + x” command

 

  • Let’s press the “Y” (Yes) button on the incoming screen.
Save modified buffer
Save modified buffer

 

  • Finally, we finished our process by pressing the “Enter” key.
File Name to Write
File Name to Write

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